Ghouls Galore: 7 haunted places across the UK

 

7. Lincoln

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Lincoln is a city steeped in rich cultural heritage and gothic architecture. It’s no surprise that in a such an ancient city, more lurks beneath the surface than a dense student populace. Greestone Stairs, a popular pedestrian route up to Lincoln’s famed cathedral, is said to play host to a gaggle of ghouls, from a nun laying a dead baby to rest to a cleric lit by lamplight that causes photographs to distort and bend light. Steep Hill isn’t the only local that will take your breath away…

6. Whitby Abbey, Whitby

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The picturesque costal town of Whitby is best seen in the flesh, so to speak. Put the postcard in the bin – Whitby is host to much more than tired seaside clichés and sandcastles. Set on a striking cliff, the Abbey is said to be occupied by its original founder, St Hilda, who is reported to manifest in one of the highest windows of the ruin wrapped in a shroud… Stick of rock? More like stick around ‘til midnight…

5. The Tower of London, London

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Mix a powerful monarchy, seemingly countless beheadings and a history steeped so much in violence it’s a wonder the soil isn’t still saturated with blood, and it’s no surprise to see The Tower of London offers more than a tourist hotspot. The White Tower, the central tower and old keep of the building, is said to plagued by a spectral spirit that exudes a stench known to make guards feel physically ill. Is it the perfume of the White Lady, or something more supernatural? Step into the Big Smoke, and try to breathe through your mouth…

4. Borely Rectory, Essex

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Once the most haunted building in England, the Borley Rectory was destroyed by a fire in 1939. Once investigated by the Daily Mirror and gaining national notoriety, the charred husk of a former Victorian mansion is reported to play the disembodied ringing of the servants’ bell to those who wander the grounds. Have you been served?

3. Pluckley Village, Kent

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Named the Most Haunted Village in England by Guinness World Records, Pluckley infamously plays host to a purported 16 spirits. Perhaps the most famed is the Screaming Man – believed to be a brickworker who fell to his death during a construction project, his distended screech can allegedly be heard throughout the village, echoing off old stone walls. Utterly chilling, whatever the season…

2. The Ancient Ram Inn, Gloucestershire

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Located on ancient ley lines running across the county that intersect under precisely under the building, the accumulation of energy and nearby running water is believed to create the ideal environment for restless spirits. Featured on international hit shows such as Ghost Hunters, the building’s current owner reports it to be play host to an insatiable incubus which has previously dragged him out of bed and attempted to rape him. Wow, what a place to drop the soap (I’ll spare you the obvious joke about ‘ramming in’)…

1. Derby Gaol, Derby

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Home to countless hangings and set on the cells of Friar Gate, strangely the paranormal activity at Derby Gaol seems to be seasonal – peaking between late September and January. But you won’t need the gnawing winter cold to send a chill down your spine here, as visitors routinely report feeling violently ill, not wanting to enter cells due to feeling intense darkness and oppression and cell doors opening and closing by themselves. One visitor has even reportedly witnessed two men hanging limply from a central beam. Curious? Pay a visit, and I sentence you to buy some new britches…

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